SAL #5 ~ Portsea Cliff

This is where I got to last time…

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Now I can reveal the finished work!

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As you can see I worked on the sand and cliff. I wanted the sand to be unobtrusive, so I chose to do it in a simple half stitch, which linked it into the sky. The cliff, however, needed to be more wild, to create the texture that I love.

(The yarn is another merino wool yarn from Fibreworks. This one was specially dyed for me. It is a colour that, surprisingly, occurs in Australian landscapes. It is wonderful for eucalyptus bark.)

Progress photo…

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The next stage ~ the trunk ~ was trickier, and to be honest, I am not sure it works quite as I wanted it to. I am not sure how the branches merge into the canopy. Any thoughts?

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I tried to include the background colours too. I suspect my problem is that I hadn’t thought it through ~ the original planning was incomplete. That area may well come out. However, I value your thoughts.

One of the things that I do love about this work is that it has brought be back to being creative after many months of obstacles. It has helped me realise that while I am not ready to get back to paint, pencils and paper, I am ready to solve creative problems (which I love doing!) with something that I can pick up and put down with ease.

In fact I have already begun my next SAL project. More of that next time.

There is a great group of creative stitchers involved in this SAL group, organised by Avis. Do drop into their blogs for their latest SAL posts. Prepare to be amazed!

Avis, Claire, Gun, Carole, Sue, Constanze, Christina, Kathy, Margaret, Cindy, Linda, Heidi, Jackie, Sunny,Hayley, Megan, Deborah, Mary Margaret, Renee, Jenny, Carmela, Jocelyn, Sharon, Daisy, Anne, Connie

 

43 thoughts on “SAL #5 ~ Portsea Cliff

  1. Gorgeous! I particularly like the textural difference between cliff and sand. I tend to agree with you about the branches within the tree’s canopy, which might be less emphatic in the same shade as the sand, for example. They are noticeably darker than the main trunk in the source photo. It’s lovely as it is, but if you’re doubtful, I do encourage you to change the colour – so much easier in yarn than in paint!

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  2. You may be right about the colour of the yarn for the branches. It makes them too obvious. The sand colour may be the solution. Maybe the canopy needs more highlight too. Thanks for your feedback ~ your eye is always so spot on, but supportive!

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    1. That’s a great idea Kathy! I wasn’t sure about merging the very white trunk with the branches that are not so white. I will give the coffee a go, and if it doesn’t work I can pull it out and go to Plan B ~ and drink the coffee!

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    1. Thanks Renee. I never contemplated doing the scene in watercolours or pencils (my other creative loves), but as soon as I saw the cliff I knew I wanted to express it as a tapestry. My next piece is underway, and is another, but very different, section of the cliff.

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    1. Thank you…yes I am very pleased. However I am even more pleased to have been creative again, after a few months of distractions in the form of medical things.☺️

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  3. definitely the tree branch/trunk needs a bit of change…the idea of dabbing on some strong coffee, (via Kathy and now me) would mean you didn’t have to get out your paints…rather grab some instant coffee and make a strong, strong brew…you can always take some out of your vessel and water it down and then add more of the strong brew as you go…

    I prefer using instant coffee but you might like to try tea…steeped in a little water, well…

    just don’t take out the white – until you’ve tried adding the coffee

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    1. It’s a great idea, isn’t it? One I would never have thought of. I will have a play. As I replied to Kathy, if it doesn’t work I can pull it out, try something else and drink the coffee!

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      1. the coffee will not be drinkable…it should be almost a paste…however, maybe paint it on some paper to create the vintage look – or if you are feeling bold, use some of my methods to overpaint your paper…even cloth. I have cloth somewhere that I wanted to look more vintagy – it worked, but that book cover still in the “to do list”

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        1. I had a thought this morning…not to use the coffee stain directly on your piece, but rather undo the white and lay it out…dab randomly – and then restitch in, the areas of coffee won’t just be blobs and you can add and subtract where necessary so it looks kind of natural…of course, you may have found another way…

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  4. I think it is just lovely the way it is. The one thing I have learned is … really there is no wrong or bad art. Your colors are striking and i think you captured its essence perfectly πŸ™‚ Sharon

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  5. Hi Anne, I just have to echo what everyone is saying-this piece is so interesting and what you have interpreted with your thread strokes as effective as any with a brush.
    I noticed “Come From Away” on your list. Gander, Newfoundland is where I was born!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Anne – this is so stunning and I love that your stitches feel like brushstrokes. The textures are fascinating. I feel like I keep alternating between zooming in on all the textures and stitches and then zooming out to take in the entire picture. Glorious!

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  7. Anne, your creativity and skill never cease to amaze me. What a lovely, lovely piece. I’ve done simple tapestry in the past, but would never have thought to create artfully in this way. I’m glad you’re finding time for creating once again. It nourishes the soul. I’m finding that a few moments here and there can satisfy, even if I don’t have a full day to take something on.

    One thought on softening the white of the tree trunk is to overstitch with some grey wool or even different textured thread. It might lend to the variations in the color of the trunk without undoing anything.

    Thanks for sharing your work.

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