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SAL

I am happy to give you a progress report in this Stitch-A-Long! And good progress too.

As you know I am doing Cathy Reavy’s Stitch Wheel Sampler. It is designed so that each cell is a different stitch.

This is where is is at the moment. Not much further to go!

Close ups of each stitch….

(I got a little muddled with my numbering on the photos. I showed you the one with the x last time. Also you can probably count better than I can. There is no #5!)

I have also added these sweet little pink flowers to the basket in the earlier ring. They are created in oyster stitch, which is rather fiddly. Some of the other stitches create petals with less fiddle.

I’m on the home stretch. Fingers crossed that it will be finished next check in!

This SAL is for our personal embroidery. The members of this group do wonderful and interesting work. Follow the links to be inspired!
AvisClaireGunCaroleConstanzeChristinaKathyMargaretCindyHeidiJackieSunnyMeganDeborahReneeCarmelaSharonDaisyAnneAJCathieLindaHelen


I respectfully acknowledge the traditional custodians of this land on which I live – the Wurundjeri Woi-wurrung People of the Kulin Nation, their spirits, ancestors, elders and community members past and emerging.

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How does my garden grow?

How does my garden grow?

Let’s take a break from exhibitions and stitching samplers and see what is happening in the garden in the almost-spring sunshine.

The long view (taken from the beginning of the front path ~ my front yard is only small!) shows the potatoes in the front. I planted them too early, and despaired about them coming up. However, eventually they did and are doing well. The striking purple plant is a mustard plant, which self seeds. The deep purple and lime green combo of the leaves is stunning.

Looking back the other way, from the front door, over the indigenous plants.

You might remember that I am growing indigenous native plants. They are doing really well. All the plants have survived, which is a success rate I have never achieved with exotic plants.

This grass clump was only a small tube stock a year ago. It has certainly bulked up.

In the photos above you might be able to see a pretty, pink flower. This delicate beauty is a thryptomene.

It is a native of Western Australia, so certainly not indigenous to my area of the grass plains of western Melbourne. I put it in a pot as the soils of Western Australia are generally much sandier than my heavy clays. It also allows me to move it around, as in flower it makes a stunning pot plant.

I am sure that these plants are unfamiliar to you, as they were to me not so long ago. So I want to introduce some to you.

Today I will show you one plant that I am delighted to have in the garden.

It is the murnong, Microseris sp., I think M. lanceolata.

Why am I delighted? Well, these little plants were extremely common across large parts of the plains. They are also called yam daisies, which tells you that the tubers can be eaten. These plants were part of the staple crop of many First Australians. Far from being gathered in an ad hoc fashion, Bruce Pascoe argues in his book “Dark Emu” that crops like the murnong were actively managed and cultivated. (There is on-going discussion about this.)

While I don’t intend to harvest the tuber ~ well, not until I have a number of plants ~ I am pleased to have them growing back where they belong.

Yes, they do look a bit like a dandelion. This link explains the difference.

An intriguing things about this little lovely is its flowers. They grow up on arching stems, and then open up to the sun. However, today is the first day that I have actually seen the flower.

I know there have been flowers, as there are at least four spent seed heads. You can see them in the photo above of the whole plant. And no, the plant hasn’t been hidden away. Not like the daffodils that I found when I weeded out the back. I go past this plant every time I walk out the front door. I have seen the buds and the spent seed head, but not, until today, the actual flower.

I was so excited! This is what it was like an hour or so ago. The photo above is of the same flower a couple of hours earlier.

It still has some opening to do. I also found a seed head. Hopefully these seeds will blow away to my garden, or someone else’s, and produce the next crop.

It is the little things that often bring us the most delight.


I respectfully acknowledge the traditional custodians of this land on which I live – the Wurundjeri Woi-wurrung People of the Kulin Nation, their spirits, ancestors, elders and community members past and emerging. They would have eaten many murnong where I now garden.

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SAL Texture

I’m late!

……for my Stitch-A-Long post that should have been posted yesterday.

So let’s get right to it.

I have been working on a stitching sampler from Cathy Reavy. Each stitch is well described on videos. I am enjoying them, but moving slowly. Thoughts are swirling somewhere about how I will use some of the stitches in my informal work.

There are two stitches completed on the outer ring.

The stitches in this outer ring will be ones that can be used for edges and boundaries.

  1. Raised Stem Band ~ this will be an interesting one to create tree trunks and branches.
  2. Stem stitch and outline stitch ~ These are very similar stitches, the only difference is whether the thread lies to the top or the bottom. Cathy has put these two together, with the stem stitch creating the pod on the left and the outline stitch on the right pod.

I have finished my jumper, so I am hopeful that I will be able to power along with this sampler at night.

This SAL is for our personal embroidery. The members of this group do wonderful and interesting work. Follow the links to be inspired!

AvisClaireGunCaroleConstanzeChristinaKathyMargaretCindyHeidiJackieSunnyMeganDeborahReneeCarmelaSharonDaisyAnneAJLauraCathieLindaHelen


I respectfully acknowledge the traditional custodians of this land on which I live – the Wurundjeri Woi-wurrung People of the Kulin Nation, their spirits, ancestors, elders and community members past and emerging.

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AnneLawsonArt My art work

‘Between Worlds’

“Between Worlds”. That’s the title of my exhibition in Kyneton, at the Old Auction House.

If you read my newsletter* you will know that I have been offered an extension to the exhibition dates. That was such a nice surprise (although not for the artist who was unable to mount theirs after mine). In Melbourne we are back in lockdown, so visiting is out of the question. I felt that maybe my collages would be locked away in the gallery for the time.

It is now running until September 13th at

The Old Auction House

52 ~ 56 Mollison St

Kyneton

Surely in that time this current lockdown will be lifted so that I can get to see it, along with lots of other Melburnians too of course. It is already open for those of you living in regional Victoria. I was delighted to come across this on the Visit Macedon Ranges website.

A taste of some of the collages in the exhibition. These are all in the Reeds series, inspired by my local wetlands.

Reeds #2 Image copyright Anne Lawson 2021
Reeds #2 Image copyright Anne Lawson 2021
Reeds #3 Image copyright Anne Lawson 2021
Reeds #3 Image copyright Anne Lawson 2021
Reeds #1 Image copyright Anne Lawson 2021
Reeds #1 Image copyright Anne Lawson 2021
Reeds #2 Image copyright Anne Lawson 2021
Reeds #4 Image copyright Anne Lawson 2021
Reeds #6 Image copyright Anne Lawson 2021
Reeds #6 Image copyright Anne Lawson 2021

* If you are interested in finding out more detail of my art practice, my newsletter is the thing to read. I publish it monthly, although at the moment, with the two exhibitions on the go, it has been a little more frequent. People tell me that they really enjoy reading it, which is always heartening to hear.


My blog looks different now. You may remember me bemoaning that I couldn’t type/edit/publish posts on WordPress on my laptop. That page was just blank. Advice was to change the theme, so I have, and it worked. I am happily typing with my fingers rather than my thumbs on the WP app on my phone. Bonus is that I quite like the clarity of this theme.


I respectfully acknowledge the traditional custodians of this land on which I live – the Wurundjeri Woi-wurrung People of the Kulin Nation, their spirits, ancestors, elders and community members past and emerging.

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SAL

SAL

I was spurred on to work on the two cells to finish the next ring of my wheel sample. You may remember that I am following Cathy Reavy’s stitching on her YouTube channel.

This is where I am now.

A close up of the latest two. The basket is to have some flowers that we will come back to sometime during the next ring.

1. Bokhara Couching

2. Raised cup stitch This stitch looks good, but was very fiddly. I am not sure I would do it again.

The stitches on the outer ring are ones that can be used as borders and edges. Hopefully next update I will have a few completed cells to show you.

This Stitch-A-Long is for showing our personal stitching. Click on the links below to discover some wonderful stitching.

AvisClaireGunCaroleConstanzeChristinaKathyMargaretCindyHeidiJackieSunnyMeganDeborahReneeCarmelaSharonDaisyAnneAJLauraCathieLindaHelen


I respectfully acknowledge the traditional custodians of this land on which I live – the Wurundjeri Woi-wurrung People of the Kulin Nation, their spirits, ancestors, elders and community members past and emerging.

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Uncategorized

All the works that are hanging at the Ascot Vale Library

Some of you lovely, supportive people have asked me to show all the works hanging at the Ascot Vale Library. So here they are:

Hope you like them.


I respectfully acknowledge the traditional custodians of this land on which I live – the Wurundjeri Woi-wurrung People of the Kulin Nation, their spirits, ancestors, elders and community members past and present.
I also acknowledge that the rock pools and dunes were inspired by places on lands belonging to the Boon Wurrung people.

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AnneLawsonArt My art work

The Ascot Vale Library Exhibition is up

Last Wednesday I carried my art works into the Library and met MJ, the Community Arts Officer. It was her hard work that enabled this to happen in the Library. And her hard work that made my works look great in the space. She was up and down the ladder quite a few times for each piece.

We decided to group the works thematically. Above the children’s shelves are the reeds and water ribbons.

This photo was taken before they were hung. The little blue postitnotes are gone.

The rock pools and dunes have been hung above the higher adult non-fiction shelves.

I was really delighted at the positive comments staff and library users made as we were hanging them. One staff member remarked on how soothing they were, and they all agreed that it was lovely to have art back on their walls.

I would love to show you how they look now they are hung, but unfortunately Victoria has gone into another lockdown and the Library is closed. I have to make do with peeking through the windows!

As I was walking past one of the librarians hastened to the window and mimed how much she loved the works. That cheered my lockdown heart!

So big thanks to MJ and the others at the Incinerator Art Gallery for giving me this opportunity to show my work to my community, and beyond.


I respectfully acknowledge the traditional custodians of this land on which I live – the Wurundjeri Woi-wurrung People of the Kulin Nation, their spirits, ancestors, elders and community members past and present.
I also acknowledge that the rock pools and dunes were inspired by places on lands belonging to the Boon Wurrung people.

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AnneLawsonArt Melbourne My art work

Three more paintings

I am running a little behind with posting my works for the exhibition, so here comes three at once!

They are still in the water ribbons series, although the first one is of reeds more than the water ribbons. I think that’s the one that will be chosen as the hero image for the exhibition.

I love that term ‘hero image’. It is the painting that is used as the image for the exhibition, on promo materials and grand banners, if I was having one of those! Instead I think it will be on the website of the Incinerator Art Gallery website, which is organising the exhibition. Maybe on the Library’s material too.

This one is cropped too tightly. While the water ribbons are close to the left edge, there are more showing than in this photo.

Tomorrow is the big day, when the works will be hung in the Library. I will have photos to show you very soon! Thanks for all the positive support and feedback you have been giving me.


I respectfully acknowledge the traditional custodians of this land on which I live – the Wurundjeri Woi-wurrung People of the Kulin Nation, their spirits, ancestors, elders and community members past and present.

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AnneLawsonArt Melbourne My art work

Water ribbons #2

The second in the water ribbons series. Water ribbons are aquatic plants that appear out of the water, away from the banks.

With this one I was playing about with oil pastel and watercolour, using the oil pastel as a resist. It was fun to move the paint around over the oil pastel, even blowing through a straw. Then I cut out around the shapes to make the thre clumps.

I like the energy in this one, and I think the background adds to it. However, it is not a favourite. In fact I wasn’t going to put it into the exhibition until a friend said it worked for her. Another example of how something appeals to one person and not another.

A reminder about the exhibition:

Ascot Vale Library

Union Rd

Ascot Vale, Melbourne

From 14th July (That’s this week –very exciting!) Until 8th December.


I respectfully acknowledge the traditional custodians of this land on which I live – the Wurundjeri Woi-wurrung People of the Kulin Nation, their spirits, ancestors, elders and community members past and present.

Categories
AnneLawsonArt My art work

Water ribbons

The more I looked at the wetlands near me, the more I saw. I first saw the reeds and their wonderful reflections, then I looked closer and saw another group of plants, the water ribbons. They have long scrappy leaves that emerge right out of the water.

I was intrigued by the seed pods that appeared, expecting them to flower. Instead, surprisingly, they stayed as berries.

With this collage I wanted to capture the strappy leaves and to show how it grows out of the water. The whole clump was created by scraping paint across the paper, and then carefully cutting out. I like the composition of the clump sitting strongly in the bottom left.

Remember it is one of the collages in the exhibition at the Ascot Vale Library, Union Rd, Ascot Vale, which opens next Wednesday, 14th July.


I respectfully acknowledge the traditional custodians of this land on which I live – the Wurundjeri Woi-wurrung People of the Kulin Nation, their spirits, ancestors, elders and community members past and present.