SAL

Yes, it’s that time again, to report in my sewing progress. However I am rather distracted at the moment. As you know there are devastating bushfires in Victoria and New South Wales. It seems like the country has been aflame for many months. Add this to extreme drought and record high temperatures. I want to blog some about that soon, as there are ramifications for all of us; in the mean time Ardez’s words, “Loving a sunburnt country” are very powerful.

I am also distracted by another dash to Emergency, with my Fella and his cracked ribs. He is on the mend, but you know the time that caring takes.

Anyway, back to my work. You can catch up with the beginnings of the work here. I was able to make good headway and finished it.

Most of the stitching is couched threads. When I got close finishing those lines I realised that the work needed more variety. You can see the French knots, but may not be able to pick up some of the running stitches that are there too. It gave just a little more texture.

abstract textile work

I was pleased with it, and offered it for a group exhibition at the Old Auction House at Kyneton. Then I thought that one was a bit lonely, so I did another! Both were accepted and are currently hanging in the gallery.

The Old Auction House is a lovely place, and has kept my creative practice going over the past year. (There’s another post about that too.) Kyneton is a regional town about an hour out of Melbourne. As well as the gallery there are other things to do, and lots of cafes for yummy lunches and coffee. So, if you live in or close to Melbourne, head out there for a lovely drive and exhibition visit. It’s on until January 20th.

The dilemma to exhibit these works was how to mount them, until I had a flash of inspiration one night while I was unable to sleep ~ to mount them onto shop bought canvases. Unfortunately the only canvases I could get were bigger than the works, which lead to the blank edge. It needed the line of sewing to give it some edge, to give it a frame. I even considered some form of quilting on that blank space. That might make some of you, especially Kate, smile ~ am I gradually inching towards being a quilter?!

Last night I set up another  work, this time based on my on going love affair with the texture and rhythms of trees. More on that one next SAL

20200105_134314

These SALs are organised by Avis. There is lots of lovely stitching to see on the following blogs, so do visit. And a warm welcome to our new member AJ.

Avis, Claire, Gun, Carole, Sue, Constanze, Christina, Kathy, Margaret, Cindy, Linda, Heidi,Jackie, Sunny, Hayley, Megan, Deborah, Mary Margaret, Renee, Jenny, Carmela, Jocelyn,Sharon, Daisy, Anne, Connie, AJ

 

65 thoughts on “SAL

  1. Love the new textile related works, I used to be a quilter with other fabric making (handweaver) you can still be classed however you want with this kind of art-making…

    And the good thing with a variety of strings to your bow, is you can while away some time, when these environmental issues just become too much…but still “be safe, my friend”

    The wind direction has apparently has changed and I’m more than 2000 km away from AU, in NZ, and our skies are clothed in both orange, yellow and some blackness (known as haze/smoke); it’s also quite cold as the sun has disappeared. So mid arvo, I’m trying to take some photos and then later make early dinner (forgot to eat lunch) and I’ve the electric light on. The only thing not tinged in orange is the computer screen…

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    1. I am sorry that we are ‘exporting’ our smoke to you. I was horrified to see the satellite images that showed how strong and how far the smoke had blown. It’s an indication of how intense the fires are.
      I didn’t know that you were a quilter. You are right about names….it is very hard to pin down the sort of fabric work we do.

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      1. this morning wind changed direction, bringing biting wind/chill from the Antarctic instead – along with drizzle, first thing, but there is patches of blue sky and the sun came out, not with an orange glow. But they do say that the smoke/haze will be back.

        It’s kind of mystifying what can be carried 1000s of km on a wind flow…

        I never got into being a big “let’s make a queen size quilt” although I did make a few wall pieces and played around with blocks…I did collect said “stash” which I use from time to time within new arena…

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        1. The wind flow also shows us, yet again, how we live in global systems. What we do somewhere will have an effect somewhere else. Biting Antarctic winds are not what you want of a summer, nor is smoke from 1000s of kms away!

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          1. yep, so changeable and hard to plan what one should do/take when out…it’s fair whistling around my yard today…”we have had a few days that seem summery” but one thing I haven’t missed is the heavy humidity 🙂

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    1. I was really pleased with the framing solution too. I think they would have lost a lot if they were behind glass. And this way is much cheaper ~ always a good idea when looking to put works in an exhibition!
      How are things going up your way? Less fire risk I hope.

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  2. Good grief! … I’ll get you quilting yet. They’re beautiful, and as a quilter I tell you: every sewn piece needs quiet space to let the eye rest, so your framing of the works with blank canvas is in the best tradition. I feel that consciousness of the fires is seeping into your work; from one point of view these are fire-lit skies and hills aflame. Deadly, but still beautiful.

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    1. That is a really interesting observation about the fires seeping into the works. It certainly wasn’t intentional, but I know our sub-consciouses work at a whole different level. Maybe too it is the consciousness of the viewer who sees and interprets with what is affecting them. Either way, I am glad these pieces are interesting enough to be open to interpretation.
      Your quilting influence is rubbing off on me! And you are quite right about the need for quiet space in any work.

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  3. I love your resourcefulness in mounting the stitched works on canvas! Thank you so much for the recommendation of my blog post. I hope you are safe from the fires and also that your fella’s rib accident happened in 2019 so that 2020 can be the start of better things!

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    1. Oh, your comment about the ribs happening in 2019 and not 2020 made me smile! I have told him it is his last fall (he has had a few over the last year, luckily nothing worse than broken ribs). I am determined that 2020 will be a better year for his health.
      I was pleased with the mounting solution too. Easy and cheap ~ important for an exhibition ~ and better than having glass over the texture.
      As for recommending your blog….you always write so beautifully, straight from your heart, it is a pleasure to share your words.

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  4. Lovely pieces and I am so sorry about the terrible brushfires. Also hope your Fella heals soon!
    Your textiles pieces evoke a sense of fire, spreading? What do you think, were you inspired by the brushfires (or I could just be hallucinating).

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    1. It is interesting that you are the second to make that connection. The fires weren’t a conscious influence; the pieces are based on the rock faces at Portsea. However, now I can certainly see fire in them. Isn’t that we see different things in art works one of the things we love about art?
      Thanks for your heart-felt wishes for the Fella’s health. He is on the mend, but it is slow.

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  5. These are beautiful, I love all the different textures, very effective. The bush fires look both terrifying and devastating, we’ve got family on the edges of Sydney so we’re following the news closely, we’re all rooting for you x

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    1. Thanks Margaret. I am glad the different textures work well. I love the tactile nature of textile works. they need to be able to be handled, don’t they?
      I hope your family in Sydney is safe and well. They have been getting some very high temperatures up there as well as the intense smoke.

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  6. I love the shape of the “wondering” green thread on purple and how you have sewn it in place.

    Australia is in my (and probably most people’s) thoughts a lot a the moment. I know it is a massive country but those fires are terrifyingly huge. I am so sad for all the animals and trees (and people, of course) who have lost their lives. The devastation is mind blowing. I hope people will wake up and recognise the line “we have had bush fires before” (and the guff in the Murdoch Press) is utter nonsense and we need to do something about it on a national and international level. I am deeply concerned that this well be the tipping point for climate change.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I agree with all you have said Emma. Scott Morrison, our Prime Minister, has made comments about ‘now not being the time to talk about climate change’. If not now, then when? As a resident of Mallacoota said “We are standing in the middle of climate change”. There will be many ecosystems that will be destroyed by these fires, and they should be a wake up call to us all.
      I am enjoying working on the purple one, going back to my favourite trees!

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    1. Kathy, that’s an interesting observation about the simplicity of the frame contrasting with the work. I was concerned that it was too bland, so seeing it through others’ eyes is really important. Framing it that way was the most satisfactory solution. (Don’t you love a flash of inspiration?!)

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  7. These are lovely. We get video’s about the fires in Australia every day on the news, they are really frightening ! It is a huge drama for all the people involved and for all the animals that died or were wounded by the fire. I so hope this will soon end !!!

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    1. News of the fires has gone around the world ~ and hopefully make people sit up and realise that climate change is now. You are right about the devastation they have caused and the amount of habitat burnt, and lost. Unfortunately the only way they say it will end is by decent rain, and there is nothing like that for a while.

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    1. Queensland copped the fires earlier, so I am glad your brother is safe. I live in inner Melbourne, so well away from the fires. However, this morning there is a pall of smoke over the whole city. It’s like looking out into a dirty mist.
      I am glad you like the sewing!

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    1. It is the texture that appeals to me too, Connie. I live the feel of them, and am glad I found a way to mount them that didn’t hide the texture behind glass. I am enjoying working on the purple piece, and will do a reveal next time.

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  8. Just lovely Anne and I am with Kate – lets get you quilting. I can imagine what you might create. Congrats on the gallery show, these deserve to be shown. Thoughts and hugs with you and your country during this terrible fire season you are experiencing. Sharon

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    1. Oh thank you for your encouragement to become a quilter! I have inched towards it at times, but I am not sure about becoming a full-blown quilter….partly because I am in awe of the beautiful quilts you produce.
      Thanks too for your hugs and support.

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      1. Kathy Reeves hosts a hand quilt along that you might want to think about joining. All quilting is done by hand and I think that might be something you would like doing. It doesn’t have to be a bed size quilt – a quilted art wall hanging piece ? appliqué work. I think it’s in your creative bent …will get you quilting 🙂

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        1. Your comment made me smile, Sharon….I don’t think I am ready to start my quilting journey just yet! However, it is great to know that there is so much encouragement out there.

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  9. I do hope your Fella is feeling better. And I am praying for some rain to help quench those fires. Your cliff embroideries turned out fabulous. And I love embroidered trees, so I cannot wait to see your next update!

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    1. I love embroidered trees too ~ well, I love trees in any form! ~ and I am enjoying working my way into this next piece. So far it is more curvy than the cliffs. My Fella is getting better, but it is slow. Ribs take a long time to heal, and aside from pain medication there is little that can be done. Thanks for your good wishes.

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    1. It is quite an intense purple, isn’t it? An unusual choice, but I wanted something dark that would contrast with the greens of the foliage, and a colour that had a lot of zing. And it was sitting there in my stash!

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  10. Hubby and I are following the devastation in Australia…horrid, and are also happy firefighters from Canada have been sent to help out.
    Meanwhile I love these two pieces…as I liked the original works these were inspired by. There is something about layers in rock and tree trunks that appeals to me. I also like how you solved the too large canvas by providing a frame for the piece as well. A little added interest.

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    1. Isn’t it wonderful how the international community helps out in times like these? The massive support has been the bright spot on these awful fires.
      There is something about the texture of rocks and trees, isn’t there? While others are take selfies, I take photos of tree trunks and rocks!! I found some beauties down on the beach the other day!
      I am glad the solution of the canvas works. I thought it was too bare, so it is great to have your thoughts about it.

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  11. I love the way you’ve mounted those lovely pieces. It sets them off beautifully.
    The coverage I’ve been seeing on the fires is harrowing. The crafters of the world are uniting though and we’re making items for the injured wildlife. The UK group was formed less than 24 hours ago and already there are over 5000 of us, desperately wanting to do something to help.

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    1. Fantastic Carole. 💕The response has been absolutely amazing ~ and now 5000 of you in the UK wanting to help. Awesome. There have been so much food and clothing donated in the last couple of days that our Premier has had to say, “Thanks, but no more at the moment.”

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      1. 10,000 now! We know you don’t want any more stuff for humans, but we’re working with the animal rescue centres and they’re saying there’s a huge need for joey pouches etc. 🙂

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  12. I also love the presentation, Anne – and they are so vibrant. Here’s wishing a slowing down of the fires there, just staggeringly widespread and destructive. But thank goodness for people working together to help one another and the wildlife.

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  13. They certainly are vibrant!
    Thanks for your good wishes about the fires. I am fortunate to be a long way from them, safely cocooned in Melbourne, but the impact they are having are tangible. The goodwill has been amazing!

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          1. Oh! I’m not a quilter! The best I can manage is a cover that looks like a giant pillow case!

            I do have a lovely hand made quilt though. It’s made with hexagonal?pieces about the size of 2 x 50 cent coins. Such painstaking work, all done by hand. It was created by a beautiful lady called Mrs Kaiser. She left it to me in her will because I’d admired it so much. That quilt has become an heirloom piece and keeps her memory alive for me.

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  14. I love your work and as Kate mentioned I also thought about the fire in Australia! We are following the news every day here in Sweden and so far it´s nothing but sad news. Praying for rain!

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    1. The goodwill from around the globe is awesome! Things have been quieter over the last couple of days, but the fire fighters are bracing themselves for expected awful weather later in the week. Fingers crossed, and yes, lots more rain please.

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  15. We’ve been following the Australian fires from rainy Seattle — wish I could share this weather with you. Your lovely pieces make me think of the contour lines on topographic maps, and a project of treks we’ve done and mountains we’ve climbed… so thank you!

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  16. Lovely work and I am glad that you are safe. My heart goes out to all the people who have lost everything, but also to the wildlife that is destroyed. Everyone is praying for rain in Australia.

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