My collage paintings

Firstly, big virtual hugs and kisses to you all, for letting me know that you are thinking of me. You make blogging and connecting a joy. I am doing well, with only a little stiffness, and my energy levels are okay. I have even been making lists, a sure sign that I am getting back to normal.

Secondly, my art work.

I can’t remember what I have told you, so let’s go back a little.

I did an online course with Tara Axford during our first lockdown last year, maybe in April? One of the many things I learnt and loved was collaging. The loving part was a very nice surprise. In our second Melbourne lockdown we could only leave home for 4 reasons; one was exercise within a 5km radius. I spent a lot of time down at my local urban wetlands and the reeds and reflections fascinated me.

Collaging and wetlands came together.

Then I found out I had been accepted to have an exhibition at the Old Auction House in Kyneton. How exciting it that! August is still a way off, but it seems to be approaching at a rather quick pace. I am building up a body of collages to exhibit.

So far I have worked on two series.

The first is of the wetlands. Some are abstract reinterpretations.

Some are more realistic.

Then I decided to switch my focus to rock pools.

Over Christmas I was lucky enough to spend time at my sister’s beach house at Somers. Somers beach has the most amazing rock pools, with colours that took my breath away. And just happened to be the colours I have been using. How could I not be smitten by something like this?

Most of the time I can tell whether the collage has worked or not. There is something that makes me smile and feel satisfied. I don’t get that feeling from the rock pools I have done so far.

The last one is the only one that resonates. For me the first two are neither realistic nor abstract enough, neither one nor the other. I would love to know what you think.

I am not giving up on the rock pools. I need to loosen up, to let go of the detail until the last; not try to recreate them as they are, instead let the paint and shapes tell me what to do.

As for the painting, all of these have been ‘painted’ with an old credit card, which I use to scrape the paint across the paper. There is little control, but wonderful effects. Then I cut out the shapes that I see in the paint. Simple and works for me!

There goes Christmas and here comes the New Year

My blogging has fallen away of late, so I never wrote the post wishing you all a happy Christmas, and thanking you for your likes and comments and friendship throughout the year. But you were in my thoughts and I almost wrote the post!

We had our family Christmas on Saturday, and then my Mum, the Fella and I went down to Somers on Christmas Eve and stayed for a few days.

Somers is a little holiday town on the Western Port Bay, looking out towards Phillip Island. There is no pub, no shop, no 24 hour store, no supermarket, only a cafe and the beach. And it is not a town on the way to anywhere else. The road goes in, curls around the edge of the coast for a little way and then heads out. Even the beaches are hidden down little sandy tracks. It’s the perfect place for peace and quiet.

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Our Christmas was very quiet but still full of love and joy, and food, of course. I made an eggplant moussaka.

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My sister and brother-in-law came down Christmas night and there was more love and joy and food. And walks along the beach ( I am not a swimmer!). One time I found this strange object……

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……which is a shark’s egg, probably a Port Jackson shark egg. Read here to find out more.

And then my little great-nephew Archie, who is one, came down with his mum. He delighted us, and seemed to fill the house with his activity and energy. The six adults watched and marvelled at everything he did, finding it all endlessly fascinating.

I hope that your holiday time was as full of love and joy as mine was, and that you found time to laugh and enjoy the company of loved ones.

Now we head towards new year. New Year’s Eve has never been an important night for me. I can remember some shocking ‘celebrations’. This year I will be at home and probably only still be up at midnight because I am absorbed in my book! However, I will be thinking back over 2018, and pondering 2109, making some plans.

No matter how we celebrate the new year, I know all of us will be wishing for a calm year, one where the earth and all who live on her have a chance to heal and find our balance again. I love this quote from Howard Zinn:

“To be hopeful in bad times is not just foolishly romantic.
It is based on the fact that human history is a history not only of cruelty,
but also of compassion, sacrifice, courage, kindness.
What we choose to emphasize in this complex history will determine our lives.
If we see only the worst, it destroys our capacity to do something.
If we remember those times and places — and there are so many —
where people have behaved magnificently, this gives us the energy to act, and at least the possibility of sending this spinning top of a world in a different direction.
And if we do act, in however small a way,
we don’t have to wait for some grand utopian future.
The future is an infinite succession of presents,
and to live now as we think human beings should live,
in defiance of all that is bad around us, is itself a marvelous victory.”

 Howard Zinn

What more can we ask for than to choose hope?

What will give you hope in 2019?

Slow days and Instagram

I seem to be taking it easy lately. I say seem to be because it wasn’t my intention. I am starting my holiday programme work next week and that gets pretty full on. So I wanted to Get Things Done ~ drawings on Etsy and blog posts and work on my other paintings ~ because I won’t have much time over the next few weeks. But that hasn’t happened, and that’s okay.

Christmas was lovely. On Christmas Eve the Fella and I went to Somers, a little seaside town on the Mornington Peninsular. Mum was there too. For Christmas lunch we cooked pancakes and ate them with smoked salmon, sour cream and salad. Yum!

The weather was hot and windy. On the other side of Victoria bushfires raged along the Great Ocean Road, and many homes were burnt. We lounged around reading, and kept an ear on the radio for any threat of fire near us. Fortunately there weren’t any. Then in the evening the wind dropped and it was a perfect night for a walk along the beach.

To top it off, the full moon was rising behind us.

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However, some things were ticked off my To Do List, like joining Instagram.

I am learning things about myself and social media. Such as I take my time to join up, which is odd, as in other areas I am quite impulsive and jump in. Part of my hesitation is knowing that they are worm holes of time that you wander down! I am often short of time.

I joined Facebook first, and added a page for my art work. Then came Pinterest. The spur for doing was that I could see many views in my Etsy shop were from it. Now I am on Instagram. Along the way I have joined some other sites, but lost interest. I am curious to watch how I use and respond to social media sites. I will write more when I have pondered some more. Which sites you use and why? I would love to hear your experiences in the comments.

So far I am enjoying Instagram. I am amazed at how quickly people seem to find my photos ~ a couple have been “liked” seconds after I have posted them! Anyway, if you are on Instagram and would like me to follow you, leave me your details in the comments. It’s always nice meeting up in different areas, sort of like seeing good friends in a variety of different bars, or coffee shops!

My username is @annelawson54 Let’s meet up!

Texture on Thursday — light and water

The last of Summer. Photos of light on water.

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

Somers Beach (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
Somers Beach (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

Somers Beach (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
Somers Beach (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

Somers Beach (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
Somers Beach (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

Somers Beach (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
Somers Beach (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

Heading home, Somers Beach (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
Heading home, Somers Beach (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

Texture on Thursday — sand

Sand photos from Somers beach, late on a summer’s afternoon.

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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

And what is a photo montage of sand without a child’s sandcastle?

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

(I was very jealous of them finding this sea urchin! I had to stop myself from quietly reaching down and ......)(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(I was very jealous of them finding this sea urchin! I had to stop myself from quietly reaching down and ……)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)