‘Uncoloured’ Exhibition in Kyneton

Kyneton is a pretty, regional town in Central Victoria, an old gold mining area. It is also the home of the Old Auction House, which is hosting a group exhibition I am involved in. It is called ‘Uncoloured’, and you will not be surprised to know that the works are all black and white.

There will be 7 of us exhibiting.

Print

I love the little glimpses of art on this flier, little teasers!

I will show you the seven feathers I am exhibiting. You will have already seen them if you get the letter from my studio. And if you don’t get the letter, why don’t you sign up, so that you can hear about the things happening in my artistic world?

I decided that pairs of feathers would be a good idea. So two guinea fowl feathers from my latest playing with ink and masking fluid.

Two tatty feathers, created with ink pens.

Two feathers with the fine lines drawn in ink. (They are created on the same type of  paper, despite one looking grey. That’s my photographic skills!)

And a single, realistic feather, created in pencil.

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All works will be for sale. I hope to sell some, of course, but I am happy to be part of this. It has been just far enough outside my comfort zone to be doable, but to push me into something different for my art. I had to give myself a little nudge, not a huge shove!

I dropped the drawings into the gallery today and received further good news from the curator ~ I have been accepted into another group exhibition in May. This one is called ‘Not your usual canvas’, and my sewing on paper art works fit the bill!

So, if you are able to visit Central Victoria, check out the exhibition. Lots of lovely places for lunch too!

[Don’t forget to keep up-to-date with my work, sign up for my fortnightly letter.]

Oyster shells

Extra time and added impetus from my sketchbook have allowed me to be fascinated by oyster shells.

You can imagine how wonderful it was to follow those quirky lines of the shells. They were fluid, but didn’t need to be really precise. I have been thinking about how to use line to build up shape. I was also playing around with a water-soluble pencil. I could draw the lines and then use water to move the graphite around the paper.

I have also been playing with simple watercolour washes to create the shells. More of them later.

I was really happy with these little studies, and have put them up for sale as a set of three in my Etsy store. I am quite okay with selling them individually too. (If you are interested in buying, follow the link to check out the details. But remember that you can always contact me here if you don’t want to go through Etsy.)

 

 

Painting — Cullen discolor

At last! I have finished my painting of Cullen discolor! It has taken me a while. In fact I wrote a post about starting the painting in December 2012. 😦 To be fair to me, I have painted lots of other works in that time.

C. discolor is a prostrate plant. My painting is of a spray arching across the page.

C. discolor, showing how it sprawls along the ground  (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2011)
C. discolor, showing how it sprawls along the ground (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2011)
My work in progress. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2014)
My work in progress. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2014)

You can see from the photo that I painted the leaves first. Once I was in the groove of leaf painting it made sense to continue. I was familiar with the paint to use and the technique for painting.

Then I had to work on the flower spikes. They were quite tricky because although they are fluffy, each pod has a distinct shape. I tried for blurry and clear at the same time! The method I used was to paint in the dark areas between each pod. That helped to build up the shape.

Painting in the stems and the flower spikes unified the painting, and people were able to read it more easily.

The finished spray (Photo and image copyright: Anne Lawson 2014)
The finished spray (Photo and image copyright: Anne Lawson 2014)

This next photo gives more detail. It is at the growing end of the spray, where the new growth is very soft.

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2014)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2014)

However, the painting as a whole wasn’t finished at this point. As a botanic artist I try to use my work to explain the plant that I am painting. While I hope I have shown the nature of the plant — the size, shape and texture of the leaves, how the leaf stems and flower spikes join the main stem, the arrangement of the leaves on the stem and so on — I know that C. discolor is an unfamiliar plant. I had to show more with my painting. As well, compositionally I needed to add to the work. The spray was just too spindly there on its own.

I decided to add a pencil drawing showing the profile of it growing in the ground. I had taken reference drawings in Menindee last year which I used to make a final drawing on tracing paper. I then used a light box to transfer the tracing to the good paper, under the painting.

Using the light box to transfer the drawing to the good paper. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2014)
Using the light box to transfer the drawing to the good paper. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2014)
Outline on the good paper. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2014)
Outline on the good paper. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2014)

Then there was the joy of gentle pencil drawing. So nice.

Pencil drawing of C. discolor. (Photo and image copyright: Anne Lawson 2014)
Pencil drawing of C. discolor. (Photo and image copyright: Anne Lawson 2014)

The painting has been put away. I will need to do some final tweaking on it in a few months, like a final edit on a manuscript. But for now I am happy, and ready to begin the next one in the series, Cullen pallidum.

(Photo and image copyright: Anne Lawson 2014)
(Photo and image copyright: Anne Lawson 2014)