A postscript to yesterday’s post

While I was in the Library I picked up a card that had the popular books of 1968. I meant to add it to yesterday’s post, about my Library’s 50th birthday, but forgot. You might find it interesting.

But before I do, I just want to give a shoutout for my newsletter which I am sending out today. I have some very exciting news (well, exciting for me!). I would love you to hear about, so, if you don’t already get my fortnightly newsletter, you might like to sign up here. No spammy stuff, I promise.

So, Popular Children’s Books of 1968

  • Tikki Tikki Tembo by Arlene Mosel (I loved reading to kids when I was a school librarian, later than ’68 though.)
  • The Foot Book: Dr. Seuss’s Wacky Book of Opposites by Dr. Seuss
  • There’s a Nightmare in My Closet by Mercer Mayer (Wonderful illustrations.)
  • The Best Nest by P.D. Eastman
  • The Tiger Who Came to Tea by Judith Kerr (Remember how the tiger drank all the water from the tap?!)

And Popular Adult Books of 1968

  • Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick
  • True Grit by Charles Portis
  • By the Prickling of my Thumbs by Agatha Christie
  • Outer Dark by Cormack McCarthy (I didn’t realise he was a popular author way back then.)
  • Dragonflight by Anne McCaffery (I loved this series; did you?)

Any there that trigger memories for you? Dredging up my memory of being a reading teenager around the late 60’s my list might include:

  • The Seventeenth Summer (a gift from an American penpal)
  • Brave New World
  • 1984
  • The Diary of Anne Frank
  • And just in case that makes me seem precocious, I was also right into trashy novels like Airport and Alistair McLean’s books.

What about you? What would be on your teenage book list?

My Library turns 50

Writing about books seems to be on my mind at the moment. I was inspired to write this post after reading Tierney’s from Tierney Creates. She posted about the stack of books she had just borrowed from her public library, and how wonderful libraries are. As she says: “So libraries are good places all over the world and librarians are some of the best people on earth (smile).” I soooo agree.

My local library is almost at the end of my street and it’s part of the fabric of the shopping strip and the neighbourhood. It’s only small ~ the building was originally a bank ~ but it fits in many activities. The busiest is probably Storytime, where mums and some dads and babies and toddlers all join in songs and stories. The noise is infectious and the prams lined up like a parking lot.

Lots of people use the library ~ to use the computers and the printer, the wifi, to read the papers, borrow books or just sit in a safe place. And it’s connected to the main library up the hill and along a little bit. You can order books using the online catalogue and pick them up. For people that don’t read hard copies any more (that’s certainly not me!) there are libraries of digital books, comics, audio books and films that are available too, to be accessed at the swish of a library card.

I think public libraries are one of the markers of a civilised society. A society that says that books, knowledge, entertainment are important and should be free to everyone, and is prepared to commit money to making that happen.

So what did I borrow this week? As usual I went in for one and came out with a few…..

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My library system is turning 50. So Happy Birthday!!! 🎉 My little library almost didn’t get to join in the celebrations, because in the early 1990’s the council wanted to close the library down. The time was an era of economic rationalism (when isn’t?) and the little shopping centre library just didn’t fit the model. But the residents didn’t want to loose their little library. We got together and demanded that it stay open. We won, thanks to a resident who was in a wheelchair and took the council to the equal opportunity board (or some such place).

The next move for the little library-almost-at-the-end-of-my-street is to have an outside make-over. At the moment it is a construction site, but it will be interesting to see how the library is brought to the outside, so more people can enjoy the space.

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