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How does my garden grow? Plants

How does my veggie garden grow?

I was going to show these photos in my earlier post about Autumn in my garden. However, I was using the WordPress app for the first time and finding that adding photos was a little trickier than I was expecting. I can’t seem to add captions, and that surprised me.

Let’s begin anew, with apologies for any glitches in the last one and glitches that may be there in this one!

I have told you that my veggie garden, which is in the front yard, had been a waste land over summer. In March I dug and mounded and added compost. Then I planted. Look at what is coming up.

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Remember this silver beet that had been lingering in a pot? It is much happier now. Behind the 5 silver beet plants are rapa. Nope, I had never heard of it either. It is a relative of broccoli, but you eat the leaves instead. I will keep you informed.

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The leeks are not quite big enough for leek and potato soup, but they are doing well. That’s garlic growing behind. My neighbour told me today that she gets a severe reaction from garlic. Wouldn’t it be sad not to have garlic in your diet?

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The broad beans are also doing well. I planted more seeds about two weeks
after these poked their leaves through the soil. The idea is to crop beans over a longer period. Good idea only if you like broad beans!

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Lastly, the parsley is still growing strongly!

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How does my garden grow?

How does my garden grow?

It’s the end of day light savings today. I love the feeling of adding an extra hour to my life. (I know, I know, it is just reclaiming it from last year, but it feels like a bonus!) It was also time to start to chop back the vine. I have mentioned before how useful our vine is to keep the house cooler in Summer. However, soon we will need the Autumn and Winter sun to come streaming in. So, the big chop has begun.

Chopping up the vine and into the green waste
Chopping up the vine and into the green waste (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

This photo makes it look like the vine prunings are tumbling into the green waste bin. (Our council collects this green waste for mulching and composting.) However, to fit it in we needed to chop it into smaller pieces. We have filled our bin, and our neighbour’s, and intend to ask the other neighbours if we can use their bin too!

Nothing to stop the sunlight streaming in now. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
Nothing to stop the sunlight streaming in now.
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

The down side of clearing the windows? I can see how grotty they are. The next task was to give them a good clean.

You may be wondering why I didn’t put the prunings into the compost bin. Firstly, they would have overwhelmed the bin. And secondly, I am having trouble with the compost bin at the moment. It has been invaded by thousands of grubs, which I think they are black soldier fly larvae. They are consuming all the matter I put into the bin, especially the kitchen scraps. And consuming it at a great rate. Can anyone help me? Metan? Is my identification correct?

Inside the compost bin (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
Inside the compost bin (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

It’s not easy to see all the larvae, but you can see see the ones on the sides. That onion peel was actually moving as the critters were munching it!

So we put in a small amount of the vine clippings and added some sugar cane mulch. They are buried under about 60 cm of material now. But I will certainly keep my eye on them! And please, any more suggestions?!

On a different note…..Last Spring I posted these photos of my ornamental garlics.

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is what they look like at the end, just before I cut them down:

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

And these are big the cloves:

The cloves of the ornamental garlic (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
The cloves of the ornamental garlic (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)