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AnneLawsonArt My art work

And the winner is……

Image and photo copyright: Anne Lawson
Image and photo copyright: Anne Lawson

Well, the feather drawing has a home to go to.

I wrote out your names and put them into the GoodLuck Bowl (aka the old ice cream container!). If you look closely you can see your piece of paper there….right there… next to the other folded piece of paper….

The GoodLuck Bowl
The GoodLuck Bowl

Then the Fella, who does a wonderful impression of a Barrel Girl 😀 pulled out the winning name

Anne Marie, from Denmark.

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A big thank you to everyone who left a comment. They were all very positive and heart warming, and told me that the name change was the right thing to do. This blogging world is an amazing place. A special mention to Meeks, who reblogged and Tweeted the post to give me more exposure. She is a fine author and her books are available on Amazon.

The sad news is that not everyone could win. 😦 The good news is that you can buy a similar feather in my Etsy shop. But if you don’t feel like going through Etsy, have a chat to me here or via annebags@optusnet.com.au and we can sort it out.

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anne4bags AnneLawsonArt My art work

A quick reminder about my feather giveaway

Just a quick reminder about my giveaway. If you leave a comment on the original post, which you can access here, you can be in the running to win a feather drawing of mine. This is what you could win.

Image and photo copyright: Anne Lawson
Image and photo copyright: Anne Lawson

A very big thank you to those of you who have commented. So many positives. I have loved reading them all, and am delighted to know that those of you who already have an art work of mine would like another!

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anne4bags My art work

Vivid green feathers

I have been doing some feather paintings lately, first I have done for a while, for too long in fact. These feathers have that flash of iridescence that I tried to capture. I thought you might like to have a look. Both are available in my Etsy shop, just click on the photo to see more.

Vivid green feather (Image and photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)
Vivid green feather (Image and photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

and the other, which is my favourite of the two….

Vivid green feather (image and photo copyright, Anne Lawson 2014)
Vivid green feather (image and photo copyright, Anne Lawson 2014)
Categories
Melbourne Travels

Portarlington with Alice

The Fella and I decided to go away in Alice the Caravan — down the Geelong Rd, through Geelong, down to Portarlington. In the non-summer months it is a little town on the beach of Port Phillip Bay. In summer the numbers swell. Apparently there are 5,000 residents a night at the caravan park in January! How nice to only have us and a handful of others when we were away.

For readers unfamiliar with my part of the world, I need to divert to a quick geography lesson — made easier, I hope, with a map! Hopefully an understanding will make my photos a bit more interesting.

Yep, when I was a girl I much preferred to colour in my maps for Geography than do my Maths homework! (Map and photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2013)
Yep, when I was a girl I much preferred to colour in my maps for Geography than do my Maths homework! (Map and photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2013)

Melbourne is situated on Port Phillip Bay, a very large body of water. Melbourne curves around its edges on the eastern side, while the western side leads to Geelong, Victoria’s second largest city. Beyond Geelong is the Bellarine Peninsula, where Portarlington is. The Bay is nearly enclosed, with only a very narrow opening at the Heads. On the western side is Queenscliff and on the eastern is Point Nepean; out through the Heads is Bass Strait.

Once we had Alice bedded down in the caravan park we wandered off to explore. There is a spot in Queenscliff, just past the fort, where you can watch the boats come through the Heads. Unfortunately, there weren’t any sailing past when we were there 😦 However, we did lunch on very yummy hamburgers with the lot!

I love this sign post -- complete with seagull! Point Nepean is the headland you can see on the other side of the Rip. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
I love this sign post — complete with seagull! Point Nepean is the headland you can see on the other side of the Rip, only 3.1 km away. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
the Rip is extrememely treacherous water, and this photo shows how the currents create rips and undertows. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
The Rip is extrememely treacherous water, and this photo shows how the currents create rips and undertows. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)

This narrow, rocky opening is very difficult for ships to navigate successfully. Each one has to be escorted in and out by a pilot who knows the waters, hence the plaque dedicated to them.

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)

Of course, there is a lighthouse at Queenscliff.

Queenscliff lighthouse (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
Queenscliff lighthouse (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)

We also wandered to Barwon Heads, where the Barwon River enters the sea. The bridge there is fabulous, really old style.

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)

The beach at Portarlington was heaven for a beachcomber like me. It is not very big, but so many shells and feathers, even a couple of sea urchin shells. I was never sure whether to look at the sand at my feet or the views across the Bay! As the caravan park is right on the beach I was able to wander at will.

The Portarlington jetty would be a perfect habitat for weedy seadragons. I looked hard, but couldn’t see any. I am sure that they must have been there, quietly wafting their way through the seaweed, talking to the starfish.

The weather turned when we were there and our last morning was showery and blustery. These photos were taken as we were leaving to head home.

Looking to the Portarlington Jetty (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
Looking to the Portarlington Jetty (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
The high rise building of Melbourne, across the showery Bay. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
The high rise building of Melbourne, across the showery Bay. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
Across the Bay to the You Yangs (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
Across the Bay to the You Yangs (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)

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anne4bags My art work

Playing with paint

I have been painting with watercolour paints for quite a few years now. However, I have never really played with the paint and often felt that I was working against it. The washes in my form of botanic art are usually very small. Stepping out to bigger areas of water and paint can cause me to panic. As we know, play is such an important way to learn, even as adults. So I am giving myself permission to play with paint. I am having such fun that the learning is almost secondary.

It began when I bought a tube of Carbazole Violet (weird name, eh?!) by Daniel Smith. I haven’t used this brand before, but the colour on the tube looked dark and inviting. At home I decided to be sensible and do a colour test. Then I decided to play. I mixed other colours with it, simply to see what colours I could make. There were some beauties.

Daniel Smith's Carbazole Violet. The tube colour is the top wash. Such a range of colours from one colour. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
Daniel Smith’s Carbazole Violet. The tube colour is the top wash. Such a range of colours from one colour. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
More sumptious colours mixed from Carbazole Violet (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
More sumptious colours mixed from Carbazole Violet
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next play session was to use one of these beautiful mixes as a wash. What else to create but a feather or two?!

Deep purple feather. You can see the influence of the original colour in this feather. (Photo and art work copyright, Anne Lawson 2013)
Deep purple feather. You can see the influence of the original colour in this feather. (Photo and art work copyright, Anne Lawson 2013)
Violet feather -- Carbazole Violet and Permanent Rose. (Photo and art work copyright Anne Lawson 2013)
Violet feather — Carbazole Violet and Permanent Rose. (Photo and art work copyright Anne Lawson 2013)

Both feathers are available in my Etsy shop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The next paint to be played with was Australian Grey. Art Spectrum have a range of colours especially created to enhance paintings of the Australian bush. This is one in that range. I don’t know where the ‘grey’ comes from as it is a warm pinky brown. Again I mixed it with a variety of paints to see what happened — and some unexpected things did happen.

Australian Grey mixed with a variety of other colours. The tube colour is the top one. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
Australian Grey mixed with a variety of other colours. The tube colour is the top one. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
More mixed colours (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
More mixed colours (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another feather, using a mix of Australian grey and permanent rose. This was too pink, so I added some viridian green to have a soft mauve. I like the result because I like the softness of the colour.

Feather using a wash of Australian grey, permanent rose and viridian green. (Photo and art work copyright Anne Lawson 2013)
Feather using a wash of Australian grey, permanent rose and viridian green. (Photo and art work copyright Anne Lawson 2013)

Not only have I learnt about the different paints and the colours they will make, but I have been able to compare the paints. The Daniel Smith violet was smooth, transparent and luscious. It was a joy to use. The Australian grey was very different. It is milky and rather opaque. (This is the composition of the paint, not the Art Spectrum brand. I am very happy with their paints, including this one.)  It didn’t move easily through the water on the paper. This was frustrating and unexpected, but it also allowed me to control the areas I wanted left lighter as the highlight.

My next play? I have some of the paint mixture left. I don’t like waste, so I have added more viridian to it to create a very soft grey. That could make an interesting feather.

(That soft pink feather will be in the shop soon — hopefully as soon as tomorrow.)

Categories
Texture

Texture on Thursday — sand

Sand photos from Somers beach, late on a summer’s afternoon.

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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
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(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)

And what is a photo montage of sand without a child’s sandcastle?

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(I was very jealous of them finding this sea urchin! I had to stop myself from quietly reaching down and ......)(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
(I was very jealous of them finding this sea urchin! I had to stop myself from quietly reaching down and ……)
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson)
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anne4bags My art work

Some more about teal feathers

I wrote a post about creating teal feathers for my Etsy store. This was to acknowledge that February was Ovarian Cancer Awareness month and that teal is the colour of Ovarian Cancer Australia. My last photo on that blog was of a feather still ‘under construction.’

This was the feather with only an under wash of watercolour.

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This is the finished feather. I used coloured pencils to layer in the colour and define the shape.

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My art work Uncategorized

Teal feathers

White feather on patterned teal background
White feather on patterned teal background (Art work and photo copyright of Anne Lawson)

February is Ovarian Cancer Awareness month. Its colour is teal. So I have been creating teal feathers for my Etsy shop, anne4bags. Well, they are also green and indigo and purple feathers. And I am donating 50% of my February sales to Ovarian Cancer Australia, to help with their vital research into this disease. (To find out more about how you can donate click here.)

Last post was about the symptoms and risks of this cancer. Have a look here if you would like to read more, or have a look at the website.

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Teal feather (Art work and photo copyright of Anne Lawson)
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2 sapphire blue feathers (Art work and photo copyright of Anne Lawson)

 

Teal feather
Teal feather

And other blue feathers

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Sapphire feather (Art work and photo copyright of Anne Lawson)
8 feathers and a bird's nest
8 feathers and a bird’s nest

And one still being created:

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All except for the 8 feathers work are A5 in size. The other is A4.

Categories
Texture

Texture on Thursday — beach

Summer is here — for half the world, anyway. During the heat the beach calls….

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Categories
My art work Travels

Travel journal

Like most people I collect things as I travel. I have inherited my Mum’s passion for brochures but I also add my own treasures from the natural world — feathers and shells and seed pods and flowers (often photos, because I know I can’t pick native plants). Then there are the memories and the information. On past travels I have kept written journals. However, over this year I have become more fascinated with pictorial journals, looking at how other artists create their keepsakes. This time I decided to record this journey to Menindee and the Flinders Ranges differently.

I have used a Daler-Rowney book. Its paper is 150 gsm, and a good quality cartridge which took watercolour washes quite well. It is 27 by 22 cm and is landscape. Although it is bound and not spiral, I really like how it opens flat. I have been able to work comfortably across the double pages.

I had so much fun at night  working on this journal. (No TV in the caravan!) I needed to think about the layout, how to make it visually interesting, what I wanted to record, as well as making each page cohesive.

I would love to know how you record your special memories. Why don’t you leave me a comment?