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AnneLawsonArt My art work

And the winner is……

Image and photo copyright: Anne Lawson
Image and photo copyright: Anne Lawson

Well, the feather drawing has a home to go to.

I wrote out your names and put them into the GoodLuck Bowl (aka the old ice cream container!). If you look closely you can see your piece of paper there….right there… next to the other folded piece of paper….

The GoodLuck Bowl
The GoodLuck Bowl

Then the Fella, who does a wonderful impression of a Barrel Girl ūüėÄ pulled out the winning name

Anne Marie, from Denmark.

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A big thank you to everyone who left a comment. They were all very positive and heart warming, and told me that the name change was the right thing to do. This blogging world is an amazing place. A special mention to Meeks, who reblogged and Tweeted the post to give me more exposure. She is a fine author and her books are available on Amazon.

The sad news is that not everyone could win. ūüė¶ The good news is that you can buy a similar feather in my Etsy shop. But if you don’t feel like going through Etsy, have a chat to me here or via annebags@optusnet.com.au and we can sort it out.

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anne4bags AnneLawsonArt My art work

A quick reminder about my feather giveaway

Just a quick reminder about my giveaway. If you leave a comment on the original post, which you can access here, you can be in the running to win a feather drawing of mine. This is what you could win.

Image and photo copyright: Anne Lawson
Image and photo copyright: Anne Lawson

A very big thank you to those of you who have commented. So many positives. I have loved reading them all, and am delighted to know that those of you who already have an art work of mine would like another!

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anne4bags AnneLawsonArt My art work

Feather drawing giveaway

It’s definitely time for a giveaway! Let me explain why….

There are things happening in my art world that has spurred me on to change the name of my Etsy shop. I am not ready yet to tell you what is happening, but I am excited. But I can tell you about the name change, and then let you know how you can have a chance to win my feather drawing.

When I left teaching I thought I would spend my time making art embellished handbags. So I set up my Etsy shop to sell the bags, and called myself anne4bags. I really wanted just plain annebags but there was a shop called that. While I was creating with material and beads and embroidery I was still going to botanic art classes, following my interest there. As time passed the shop morphed into my art work rather than bags, but the name stayed the same.

I have been pondering the change for a while, thinking about sold art works that were linked to the old name. I realised that it had to happen, that there are more reasons to change than to not. The biggest reason is that the name anne4bags does not reflect anything about the work that I currently do.

So, after doing a small amount research I decided to go simple. Let me introduce you to

AnneLawsonArt

[Etsy won’t let me put in spaces between the words and Facebook demands the spaces! Strange old world.]

It’s time to give the shop a little makeover, working on the photos, tweaking some older descriptions and checking out the tags. Other than that there is the same high quality, original art work available at very reasonable¬†prices. Click here if you would like to have a look.

To celebrate the name change I have decided to have a feather drawing giveaway. This is the feather you will win

Image and photo copyright: Anne Lawson
Image and photo copyright: Anne Lawson

These feathers, created in ink, are very popular, and I enjoy drawing them. The rhythm of the parallel lines is quite soothing. This one is on Arches watercolour paper. This is a good quality, acid free paper. It is an A5 size, 15 x 21 cm or 5.8 x 8.2 inches and the drawing sits horizontally.

To have a chance of winning¬†is very simple……leave a comment¬†below,¬†about anything you like. Just make sure that you leave it on this post by Sunday 15th November. I will write the names of the commenters on slips of paper and ask the Fella to draw one out. I am quite happy to send it anywhere in the world, so don’t be shy. ūüôā

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Artists Botanic Art Melbourne Plants

The Art of Botanical Illustration 2014

Unfortunately the Art of Botanical Illustration Exhibition, organised by the friends of the Royal Botanical Gardens, Melbourne, is finished. Also, again unfortunately, I have no photos to show you. Photography was not allowed. Even if it was I would not show photos of the works of others without their permission. They are not mine to show. However follow this link to the Friends website to see the digital catalogue. Other links through the post will take you to menu of the catalogue and from there you can select the name of the artist I am referring to.

Botanic art is not still life or floral art [perfectly valid art forms], but rather a scientific depiction of a¬†plant. That sounds rather dry until you recognise that¬†there is a spectrum, from the pure scientific drawings that you would see in an encyclopaedia of plants, drawings that have to be accurate to exact length of the hairs on the stem, through to paintings that might be ‘portraits’ of the plant, almost floral art. Within that range there is scope for all sorts of works.

There were paintings in the exhibition that some might have been taken aback to see — orange segments, single autumn leaves, walnuts and seaweed. For me, each work displayed showed the amazing diversity, complexity and fragility of the our world.

It is the artist’s job to tell the story of the plant, flowers and seed, habit and form; to convey the complexity of the plant.¬†We have to make artistic decisions about how to do that. What medium is best suited to the plant? What composition will tell the story best?¬†I am always amazed at the quality of the works in exhibitions, and feel lucky to be able to learn from these wonderful artists.

Watercolour is the traditional medium for botanic artists. It has a transparency that allows the light to shine through. If you get it right it is perfect for plants like roses and poppies or plants that have very fine detail. Jennifer Wilkinson‘s Iceland poppy shows how subtle and delicate watercolour can be.

A number of artists chose other mediums because they were better suited to their plant. Have a look at Simon Deere‘s wonderful, controlled works in graphite [pencil]. Other artists, like¬†Sandra Johnston, selected¬†coloured pencils. The bark on Sandra’s¬†eucalyptus work is amazing. For others the best solution was a mix of media. Two of my favourites used watercolour and graphite.

Joanna Hyunsuk Kim exhibited a couple of Strelizias, and both were gorgeous. However it was the S. nicolai that demanded that I stop and look. It was a dried flower head. The detail of the husk was captured beautifully in graphite, while the petals were watercolour. What really made it for me were the seeds. They had been painted in bright orange and popped off the page when compared to the muted tones of the rest.

Another perfect¬†mix of media was Anne HayesBanksia serrata. The image on the website is lovely, but it doesn’t show the texture of the original. If you have ever touched the leaves of a banksia you will know that they have an interesting combination of a fuzzy surface with tough, prickly structure. Anne has captured that beautifully. And the control of the pattern of the seed head……oh my.

I was also taking note of composition, looking to see how others tell the story of the plant. I was lucky that on my plant, Cullen palladium,  the seeds, mature flowers and buds are all on the one spray. Other specimens are not so accommodating!

Fiona McKinnon¬†solved the problem by having the different stages of the plant¬†on different stalks that intertwined over the page. Kate Nolan’s composition for her Spinifex sericeus¬†combined a couple of strand of the plant. This was another wonderful example of mixing media. Who knew that the humble beach grass could be so ethereal?

These are just a small number of the works. If you saw the exhibition, I hoped you liked it. Tell us, in the comments, which was your favourite. If you missed it, there will be another in two years, with another stunning selection of delights for you.

 

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anne4bags My art work

Playing with paint

I have been painting with watercolour paints for quite a few years now. However, I have never really played with the paint and often felt that I was working against it. The washes in my form of botanic art are usually very small. Stepping out to bigger areas of water and paint can cause me to panic. As we know, play is such an important way to learn, even as adults. So I am giving myself permission to play with paint. I am having such fun that the learning is almost secondary.

It began when I bought a tube of Carbazole Violet (weird name, eh?!) by Daniel Smith. I haven’t used this brand before, but the colour on the tube looked dark and inviting. At home I decided to be sensible and do a colour test. Then I decided to play. I mixed other colours with it, simply to see what colours I could make. There were some beauties.

Daniel Smith's Carbazole Violet. The tube colour is the top wash. Such a range of colours from one colour. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
Daniel Smith’s Carbazole Violet. The tube colour is the top wash. Such a range of colours from one colour. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
More sumptious colours mixed from Carbazole Violet (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
More sumptious colours mixed from Carbazole Violet
(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next play session was to use one of these beautiful mixes as a wash. What else to create but a feather or two?!

Deep purple feather. You can see the influence of the original colour in this feather. (Photo and art work copyright, Anne Lawson 2013)
Deep purple feather. You can see the influence of the original colour in this feather. (Photo and art work copyright, Anne Lawson 2013)
Violet feather -- Carbazole Violet and Permanent Rose. (Photo and art work copyright Anne Lawson 2013)
Violet feather — Carbazole Violet and Permanent Rose. (Photo and art work copyright Anne Lawson 2013)

Both feathers are available in my Etsy shop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The next paint to be played with was Australian Grey. Art Spectrum have a range of colours especially created to enhance paintings of the Australian bush. This is one in that range. I don’t know where the ‘grey’ comes from as it is a warm pinky brown. Again I mixed it with a variety of paints to see what happened — and some unexpected things did happen.

Australian Grey mixed with a variety of other colours. The tube colour is the top one. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
Australian Grey mixed with a variety of other colours. The tube colour is the top one. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
More mixed colours (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)
More mixed colours (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson 2013)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another feather, using a mix of Australian grey and permanent rose. This was too pink, so I added some viridian green to have a soft mauve. I like the result because I like the softness of the colour.

Feather using a wash of Australian grey, permanent rose and viridian green. (Photo and art work copyright Anne Lawson 2013)
Feather using a wash of Australian grey, permanent rose and viridian green. (Photo and art work copyright Anne Lawson 2013)

Not only have I learnt about the different paints and the colours they will make, but I have been able to compare the paints. The Daniel Smith violet was smooth, transparent and luscious. It was a joy to use. The Australian grey was very different. It is milky and rather opaque. (This is the composition of the paint, not the Art Spectrum brand. I am very happy with their paints, including this one.) ¬†It didn’t move easily through the water on the paper. This was frustrating and unexpected, but it also allowed me to control the areas I wanted left lighter as the highlight.

My next play? I have some of the paint mixture left. I don’t like waste, so I have added more viridian to it to create a very soft grey. That could make an interesting feather.

(That soft pink feather will be in the shop soon — hopefully as soon as tomorrow.)

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anne4bags My art work

Some more about teal feathers

I wrote a post about creating teal feathers for my Etsy store. This was to acknowledge that February was Ovarian Cancer Awareness month and that teal is the colour of Ovarian Cancer Australia. My last photo on that blog was of a feather still ‘under construction.’

This was the feather with only an under wash of watercolour.

IMG_7098

This is the finished feather. I used coloured pencils to layer in the colour and define the shape.

IMG_7267

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My art work Uncategorized

Teal feathers

White feather on patterned teal background
White feather on patterned teal background (Art work and photo copyright of Anne Lawson)

February is Ovarian Cancer Awareness month. Its colour is teal. So I have been creating teal feathers for my Etsy shop, anne4bags. Well, they are also green and indigo and purple feathers. And I am donating 50% of my February sales to Ovarian Cancer Australia, to help with their vital research into this disease. (To find out more about how you can donate click here.)

Last post was about the symptoms and risks of this cancer. Have a look here if you would like to read more, or have a look at the website.

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Teal feather (Art work and photo copyright of Anne Lawson)
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2 sapphire blue feathers (Art work and photo copyright of Anne Lawson)

 

Teal feather
Teal feather

And other blue feathers

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Sapphire feather (Art work and photo copyright of Anne Lawson)
8 feathers and a bird's nest
8 feathers and a bird’s nest

And one still being created:

IMG_7098

All except for the 8 feathers work are A5 in size. The other is A4.

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My art work Travels

Travel journal

Like most people I collect things as I travel. I have inherited my Mum’s passion for brochures but I also add my own treasures from the natural world — feathers and shells and seed pods and flowers (often photos, because I know I can’t pick native plants). Then there are the memories and the information. On past travels I have kept written journals. However, over this year I have become more fascinated with pictorial journals, looking at how other artists create their keepsakes. This time I decided to record this journey to Menindee and the Flinders Ranges differently.

I have used a Daler-Rowney book. Its paper is 150 gsm, and a good quality cartridge which took watercolour washes quite well. It is 27 by 22 cm and is landscape. Although it is bound and not spiral, I really like how it opens flat. I have been able to work comfortably across the double pages.

I had so much fun at night  working on this journal. (No TV in the caravan!) I needed to think about the layout, how to make it visually interesting, what I wanted to record, as well as making each page cohesive.

I would love to know how you record your special memories. Why don’t you leave me a comment?

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My art work

Goose feather

Just finished and listed in the Etsy shop, a pencil drawing of a goose feather.