SAL#2 ~ Portsea cliff

Well, I am now officially part of the Stitch-A-Long group. Thank you Avis for hosting it. There are a quite a few people who show their personal stitching, so do have a look at their lovely work. The links are at the end of the post.

Last time I was mulling over the cloud in my tapestry.

Anne Lawson Art Textile artist

I was happy with how it turned out. Time to work out the next section, the bushes on the cliff in the background.

Using the photo as a guide ~ that’s the feature photo at the top of this post ~ my stitching interpretation needed to include:

  • the dark mass behind the tree. The tree is the focal point needs the dark tones to make it stand out. However, the mass is not a uniform darkness, it has different tones within in it.
  • some of the sky showing between the bushes, especially at the top of the cliff.
  • a suggestion of individual trees and bushes, without too much detail.
  • a density

These were the yarns I selected from my stash. The big browny/green ball is the main colour. My notes tell me I got it from Swish Yarns, but nothing more than that. It is quite a wiry yarn, which may be linen, and I think it works well.

Anne Lawson textile artist

The others I used as highlights and extra tonal contrast, which you can sort of see in this photo.

Anne Lawson textile artist

The stitching is very random, although I tried to show the direction of some of the canopy; trying to give the impression of individual trees rather than stitching each individual one.

Anne Lawson textile artist

This is where I am at the moment.

Anne Lawson textile artist

And the overall view

Anne Lawson textile artist

I think it works. I know from my other art works that a work in progress is very hard to judge. Although I can compare what I see in my mind and how I want it to look, in reality this section can only be compared to the sky. How will it blend in with the other elements, especially the focal tree? If it doesn’t work I will remove it and try something different.

Many of the yarns I use, like the sky and the shadow area, are merino wool from Fibreworks. They are a delight to stitch with. However I have found that the moths find them delightful too, munching holes in the balls. Fortunately I use shorter lengths, rather than needing the continuous yarn for knitting or crocheting. Any thoughts on how to keep the critters away?

Anne Lawson textile artist

More stitching adventures can be found below. We post on the 22nd of the month, so, depending on your time zone, some posts may not be up. Drop back later.

AvisClaireGunCaroleSueConstanzeChristinaKathyMargaretCindyHelenLindaHeidiJackieSunnyHayleyMeganDeborah, Clare, Mary MargaretReneeJennyCarmelaJocelynSharonSusanAnne

57 thoughts on “SAL#2 ~ Portsea cliff

  1. Don’t we all have those unfinished projects, under tables, in boxes, lurking in places we don’t want to look! I am glad the sky works for you ~ the wonderful variegated yarn does most of the work.

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  2. I can see where you are going – or trying to go – one never knows at first 🙂 It’s quite an ambitious project with all those hues and tones and tints that are so similar – but you certainly have the talent and the ability!! I shall look forward to watching this emerge!

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    1. One never does quite know! That’s the beauty of creating, I think….you can have the ideas, but things change when getting the ideas from your head to your hands to the paper. Those serendipities create the magic. I am interested to watch this emerge too. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Fascinating to see how you’re interpreting the scenery with thread.
    Have you tried cedar balls in with your threads? They are supposed to repel moths and it’s a natural product so all good.

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  4. I love the texture you’re introducing to evoke the foliage. Really beautiful, and great colour choices. About the moths: Keep your yarns in a closed box, and have a few cedar balls in the bottom. Works for me!

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    1. Two suggestions for cedar balls…. and from women who know about these things. I keep them in an open wire basket, mainly so I can see what I have got. A box is a more sensible idea.
      Thanks for the feedback about the colours and textures. It helps to understand what others are seeing.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Conkers? Wow! thanks for the offer to post me some, but they will not pass our quarantine restrictions. Echoes of the conversation we have had about jewellery in the post to Australia!

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  5. Oh my goodness, so sorry. I have been really slow on the uptake and not added you to my post. Welcome to the SAL – will definitely add you next time round. Love the random nature of your stitching as it adds real texture. Looking forward to seeing this progress.

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    1. Thanks for your comment. No worries about not adding me…there is always next month! As for the random nature, I get bored doing rows of the same stitch; this helps to keep my brain engaged and happy!

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    1. I had to learn to to be happy about unstitching areas that don’t work. I learnt the lesson from a close friend, who would unpick many times until she got the effect she was looking for. I am not sure I have her patience, but I will rip it out once if necessary.

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  6. I know nothing of the craft so all I can say is that it looks good so far. 🙂 As for the moths, how about putting the wool into freezer bags and sealing with the ties that come with. I’m not sure but I think you have to stop the moths from laying their eggs in the wool so the little hatchlings don’t chomp their way through it. :/

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    1. Interesting idea Meeks. A couple of women have suggested cedar balls, so may be the balls in the freezer bags? Or may be I will be too lazy to do anything, and just grumble about the moths!

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  7. I hadn’t realized you’d outlined your imagery with thread. It looked like ink or pencil to me in the last post. What a good idea. I’m trying to create a circle with white floss on white canvas (for my secret project) and have lost the original pencil line designating the perimeter of the circle. Must remember this trick! Meanwhile, I admire your ability to stitch for texture rather than to a stitch diagram. Not sure I have the courage to do that. Yet. 😉

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    1. Pencil/ink doesn’t work well on this open weave canvas. Also I like the idea of being able to remove the threads, and worry that a permanent mark might stay permanent! Do try stitching your circle….but then I wonder whether you will need a pencil guideline to follow for the temporary stitching? (I am very intrigued with your secret project!)
      I started playing with samplers ~ 10 x 10 cm (4 x 4 inches), trying different stitches with different threads, size etc, layering them. Playing, with no expectation of an end product.

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    1. I am glad you enjoyed the post. Thanks for including me in this group, and for the head’s up on the next posting date. i am looking forward to seeing what everyone else has been up to.

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  8. Welcome Anne! Your tapestry work is quite inspired, I am really looking forward to seeing your progress and reading your narrative about it. I wouldn’t know where to begin, so this will be very interesting.

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    1. Thank you Kathy. My inspiration comes from the photos, and I am learning what vegetation will work well with this type of stitching. Windswept heathlands seem to be good as they have lots of texture but not a lot of detail.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Hi, Your idea and artistic ability are way beyond my own. I love the yarn colours. Art is created by one stitch or one brushstroke or even one carving at a time. Just goo with your idea it will work out fine.

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    1. Thanks for the support. In fact one of those famous artists (Cezanne? Gaugin?) would make one brush stroke, step back and evaluate it against the ones before. I am far more slap-dash than that!

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  10. I tried to pay attention to the entire post and all the meticulous work you were putting into your piece but I was highly distracted by the amazing photo that opened this post! That is going to be an amazing piece. Okay now back to that photo – I think I see some of the trees that inspire your amazing watercolor and ink trees!

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  11. you need a dedicated yarn freezer…or if you can’t manage an individual one, then find room in your regular freezer for your wool yarns; especially the ones you don’t want the critters to eat…
    make sure you label the bags, you don’t want to take out what appears to be meatball to defrost and find later it’s not quite !@#$%^&*()

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