The Maritime Museum, Fremantle, part 2, Or Life Under Water

As well as Australia II, Jon Sanders’ yacht and other interesting displays, the Maritime Museum also has a submarine. Submarines, like space craft, have always held a fascination for me. What is it really like in there? How do people live in such environments? So a tour of the submarine was exciting.

Every space was used and everything had a purpose. But the best way to describe the space is by showing you photos. 

(And apologies for those who want technical details and correct terms — you wont get them, because I was much more interested in life on board! I can’t even remember what sort of submarine it is; I think it is the one before the Collins Class.)

The submarine (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

The submarine (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

Let me reassure you, the submarine wasn’t under water!

We went in through the escape hatch, which was at one end of the sub. This area had a number of different life saving devices, including the suit that you can see in the photo. The tour guide, who had been a submariner, didn’t say what the options were if, in the event of a disaster, you couldn’t get to this part.

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

These next photos show the crew’s sleeping quarters. These bunks were really narrow and in tiers of threes. There were more to the left and another row behind me. Not only was it a sleeping area, but also dining and rec areas. There was even an ingenious way of showing films, by projecting the film from the room next door through a little opening.

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

Mike the Tour Guide. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

Compare the space that the Captain had, although this photo was taken from the door, so there wasn’t much more room.

Captain's cabin (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

Captain’s cabin (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

The small galley would force you to be a tidy and efficient cook. Also, you would have to be a whizz with a can opener! Again, these photos were taken from the doorway.

Right side of the galley -- and yes, that cook is a model. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

Right side of the galley — and yes, that cook is a model. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

The left side of the galley. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

The left side of the galley. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

The garbage ejector. Garbage was loaded into bags which were weighted to ensure that they would sink. That way there was no tell tale trail of garbage floating on the surface of the water.

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

Of course we all want to know about the toilet and showering arrangements. Well, they were small and probably not very private — much like the rest of life on board. You can see from the photo of the shower how I had to twist around the doorway to take it. 

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This submarine was operating in the pre-digital age, so photos were taken using film. This cabin was also the dark room– no need for blackout curtains! You can see the photos hanging up to dry. 

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

The driver’s seat! (I am sure that it has a proper name, but I like my term!)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

While I wasn’t interested in the technical data, I did love the shapes and patterns of the dials, gauges and knobs. 

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

Apparently you do need keys on a submarine! (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

Apparently you do need keys on a submarine! (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

But my favourites were the valve handles. There were myriad pipes running through the submarine, carrying different liquids — fresh water, fuel etc. To quickly and easily recognise what each pipe was carrying, they had the ingenious system of having different colours and shapes for the handles. Then the correct one can be turned, even in an emergency or in the dark. 

Let's finish off my tour with a selection.

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

Let's finish off my tour with a selection.

(Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2014)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was a relief to come out from there, into the fresh air and sunlight. I doubt that I could easily live in an environment so separated from the natural world. 

Advertisements

About anne54

Botanic artist
This entry was posted in Travels and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Nothing like a good natter, so let's have a chat!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s