How does my garden grow?

Well, it is ungrowing at the moment. That may not be a real term, but it sums up what I am doing.

I had a bed that was annoying me. It had my two rose bushes in the middle of it, an impossible position to easily to pick flowers and deadhead. I had planted two pear trees, with the (as it turns out) grandiose idea of espaliering them. One died. The other flourished. It has produced a couple of odd shaped pears and was regularly attacked by slugs. Again, I couldn’t get to it easily. Other things were overgrown and tangled. Time for a clean out — or an ungrowing time.

The garden bed that is in the process of ungrowing. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2013

The garden bed that is in the process of ungrowing. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2013

I have cut back both roses and moved one out. If it survives I will replant it back in the bed, but closer to the edge.

One of the roses. This is the Red Cross rose. Believe it or not, the flowers are red! (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2013)

One of the roses. This is the Red Cross rose — believe it or not, the flowers are red! (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2013)

During the clean out I found a correa that was lingering under another correa. So that came out. Again, if it survives, I will plant it back there, but with more room and light.

The 'half correa, and it is still alive! (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2013)

The ‘half correa, and it is still alive! (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2013)

[By the way, correas are one of my favourite plants. They so hardy. I have four and a half (the half being the one I found!) and they all came through 10 years of drought. They got little extra water during that time.]

In the large photo above you can see a tufty thing up the back. That was the next to get a hair cut. I don’t know what it is, but it has rather vicious spikes and it too was very drought tolerant. As I was cutting back the strappy leaves I was thinking about keeping them to make into baskets. I don’t basket weave but if I did, these would have been perfect.

In need of a hair cut. Behind is another correa, called Chef's Cap. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2013)

In need of a hair cut. Behind is another correa, called Chef’s Cap. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2013)

Then we took out the pear tree. “We” is probably definitely the wrong pronoun! I stood and watched as my Fella used a block and tackle to drag it out.

Using a block and tackle to heave out the pear tree. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2013)

Using a block and tackle to heave out the pear tree. (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2013)

Close up (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2013)

Close up (Photo copyright: Anne Lawson, 2013)

I have also found a number of bulbs, quite possibly snow flakes and nerines, as well as neglected iris rhizomes. I will spread blood and bone and compost. Then I will leave it, while I think about what I am going to put where. We have had some frosty mornings lately so it is too cold to plant anything yet. Any suggestions? Especially for something that might grow along a fence, need no looking after but will not be too vigorous.

In the meantime I will keep reading the gardening blogs of those of you who live in the Northern Hemisphere, and will enjoy your luscious photos of flowers blooming in  Summer’s warmth. Like these

My Botanical Garden

Gwennies Garden

Dandelion House

Chris Condello  (I love his tag — plant petunias and question everything!)

Cheers!

Advertisements

About anne54

Botanic artist
This entry was posted in How does my garden grow?, Plants and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

12 Responses to How does my garden grow?

  1. I remember having to dig out some old, established standard roses some years ago. It was a total nightmare and I wish I’d thought of a block and tackle then. I shall have to look at “correas” as we have a West facing bed, in the garden, in which so much gets toasted in the afternoon summer sun.

    Like

  2. EllaDee says:

    That’s happened to me… In past gardens I’ve planted things and they haven’t grown at all, or how and where I want. Currently I have a dusty balcony with a few succulents and an absentee garden but http://figjamandlimecordial.com/ has a great backyard garden and heaps of ideas of what to grow. One day I will use her blog as a reference resource and create something akin to her & Pete’s garden. Good luck with yours.

    Like

    • anneb54 says:

      Nothing lingers in my garden. It either dies immediately, or it flourishes so well that it is out of control, and I need to cut it back or dig it up! EllaDee, I am sure that soon you will have a garden that you can potter in to your heart’s content. Thanks for the link. It looks like a really interesting and inspiring blog. 🙂

      Like

  3. tamara says:

    Anne, thank you for trusting me, I hope I will bring a bit of our summer down to Australia! For the fence I would suggest Bougainvillea, but i am not sure about the climate you have? I wish Bougainvillea would grow at my home!

    Like

    • anneb54 says:

      Thank you for visiting — and sharing your Summer! I love bougainvilleas. Their colours are astounding. They do grow here. In fact I had one that covered my back fence, took over the BBQ area and then the shed. Getting rid of it was a nightmare. However, I am sure that growers have developed ones with less invasive habits. So thanks for the suggestion, I will look into it.

      Like

      • tamara says:

        Sorry for the bad advice-bougainvillea are not considered invasive here, I agree plant covering and taking over whole garden is a night mare! Anyway, let me know what are you going to plant! Wish you good luck!

        Like

  4. roberta4949 says:

    looks like you got your work cut out for you, it will be worth it once you get it together and you get beautiful flowers and plants growing in a organized manner, have fun with it in planning it and creating a space you can be proud of because you did it not someone else.

    Like

    • anneb54 says:

      Thank you for your confidence! I rather fancy some flowers. It was difficult to plant and sustain annuals during those long years of drought. I know will will have water issues in the future, but I would like some foxgloves, pansies and granny’s bonnets.

      Like

  5. metan says:

    Have you thought of planting some grevilleas there? We have a few different types in our garden, some are big and some are ground covers, all are loved by the birds and don’t need watering!

    Like

  6. james says:

    This is some serious gardening talk! I don’t recognize half the gardening terms. But all in all, very interesting stuff. 🙂

    Like

  7. retrofemmeobjetdart says:

    It’s interesting to observe what does or doesn’t thrive in a garden isn’t it. I love watching things unexpectedly appear which have self seeded or have been forgotten about/given up on. I imagine you both needed a hot bath and a toddy after all that work. 🙂

    Like

  8. Pingback: How does my garden grow? | Anne Lawson

Nothing like a good natter, so let's have a chat!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s